NPR @npr
12 Posts
2.3m Followers
545 Following
Why GM Workers Are Striking
12 Posts
2.3m Followers
545 Following
Why GM Workers Are Striking
npr
Nearly 50,000 General Motors employees with the United Auto Workers went on strike Sunday morning as the collective bargaining agreement from 2015 expired. The union is calling for the Detroit automaker to properly recognize everything their members have done and sacrificed to make a "healthy, profitable" auto industry. This series of portraits highlights why some members took to the picket lines on Day 2 and 3 of the labor dispute. Tap the link in our bio for the full story. (Images: @elaine_cromie | Elaine Cromie for NPR) 1. “I am here for my family; that's my No. 1 goal. I want to be able to further my education. I want to be able to provide for my kids.” – Latrice Strong 2. “I think everybody deserves fair treatment. Everybody comes in here every day and works their butt off.” – Antonio Martinez 3. “I’m out here for America’s middle class, which is us.” – Troy Fisher 4. “The poor temps, those people are treated like dogs in here. They have no recourse.” – Christina Mathis
1k 23
npr
You've signed up for classes, you've learned your way around campus — and now, you've got to make sure you survive all the way to graduation. Laptop or paper notes? Highlighter or flashcards? And does music help while studying?(Image: @pmvickers | Paige Vickers for NPR)
2k 25
npr
Samuel Swedi, 22, is an electrical engineering student at Goma University in the Democratic Republic of Congo. For a variety of reasons, the people in eastern Congo are skeptical about the international efforts to quash the Ebola crisis that has claimed 2,000 lives so far. (Image: @samreinders | Samantha Reinders for NPR)
3k 26
npr
After more than $10 million of renovations, which include a new security screening facility and elevator, the Washington Monument reopens to tourists on Thursday. Follow the link in our bio for the full story. 1. People stand outside the Washington Monument. 2. National Park Service rangers stand outside the newly constructed screening facility. 3. The view from the south lookout window inside the newly renovated Washington Monument. (Image: @mharishaw | Mhari Shaw/NPR)
7k 85
npr
For many college students settling into their dorms this month, the path to campus — and paying for college — started long ago. And it likely involved their families. The pressure to send kids to college, coupled with the realities of tuition, has fundamentally changed the experience of being middle class in America, says Caitlin Zaloom, an anthropologist and associate professor at New York University. It's changed the way that middle class parents raise their children, she adds, and shaped family dynamics along the way. Zaloom interviewed dozens of families taking out student loans for her new book, Indebted: How Families Make College Work at Any Cost. She defines those families as middle class because they make too much to qualify for federal aid — but too little to pay the full cost of a degree at most colleges. For many, the burden of student debt raises big questions about what a degree is for. (Image: @delphinemonkey | Delphine Lee for NPR)
3k 57
npr
Dr. Peter Grinspoon was a practicing physician when he became addicted to opioids. After he was caught and entered rehab, Grinspoon wasn't allowed access to the drugs that are now the standard treatment for addiction, buprenorphine or methadone, precisely because he was a doctor. He thinks that policy is a mistake. "Why on earth," Grinspoon says, "would you deny physicians — who are under so much stress and who have a higher access and a higher addiction rate — why would you deny them the one lifesaving treatment for this deadly disease that's killing more people in this country every year than died in the entire Vietnam War? There's no reason for it." Grinspoon eventually recovered, but only, he says, after going through several "awful" rehab experiences. "I recovered despite going to rehab not because I went to rehab," he says. (Image: @_tonyluong | Tony Luong for NPR)
9k 282
npr
Veteran journalist Cokie Roberts, who joined an upstart NPR in 1978 and left an indelible imprint on the growing network with her coverage of Washington politics before later going to ABC News, has died. She was 75. Roberts died Tuesday because of complications from breast cancer, according to a family statement. A bestselling author and Emmy Award winner, Roberts was one of NPR's most recognizable voices and is considered one of a handful of pioneering female journalists — along with Nina Totenberg, Linda Wertheimer and Susan Stamberg — who helped shape the public broadcaster's sound and culture at a time when few women held prominent roles in journalism. (Image: Ariel Zambelich/NPR)
60k 1k
npr
Early this year, the president declared an emergency to address the issue of sexual assault — then ended it some months later without explanation. Activists are not happy but are still hopeful. Illustration by @nicolexu_ | Nicole Xu for NPR
5k 111