Architectural Digest @archdigest
3k Posts
2.7m Followers
468 Following
The International Design Authority.
3k Posts
2.7m Followers
468 Following
The International Design Authority.
When designer @jamiebushco was called upon to update architect Frank Wynkoop’s 1951 Butterfly House in Carmel for a young family, he focused on bringing the rugged, organic, even brutal quality of the shoreline into the look and feel of the interiors. “I wanted the interiors to celebrate the irregularities of pattern and texture in nature,” says Bush. Hence, the hand-troweled plaster walls, carved-stone sinks, custom bronze hardware, and hemp-and-silk rugs, all joined by pedigreed vintage furnishings as well as site-specific commissions from contemporary artisans such as renowned California ceramist Stan Bitters. “Jamie’s great success was marrying midcentury with a contemporary sensibility and the practicality of a family home,” says Hannah. “He also managed to indulge our passion for luxurious furnishings.” The master bath is clad in flamed quartzite and features a tub by @signaturehw with @watermarkbrooklyn fittings, and custom cabinetry in stained white oak. The custom side table is by @stefanbishop. See more of the home through the link in our profile. Photo by @thefacinator; text by @malleryrmorgan; styled by @michaelreynoldsnyc
11k 72
After falling in love across the pond, Londoner Hannah Comolli and American businessman Kevin Comolli quickly discovered a shared passion for California, and eventually decamped from London for a new life in Carmel. The couple had long admired architect Frank Wynkoop’s 1951 Butterfly House, so named for the structure’s signature winged roof design. Perched atop a rocky coastal outcropping, the residence was one of only a handful of oceanfront properties in the area. “I never imagined it could be a family home,” Hannah says of its relatively compact footprint of approximately 3,000 square feet. “But the moment we walked into the house I felt overcome with excitement. We knew immediately it was a treasure,” she says. “It feels like you’re living in the most fabulous aquarium, in harmony with the ever-changing seascape and the extraordinary array of marine life just beyond the doorstep.” Determined to respect Wynkoop’s original vision, the Comollis enlisted Los Angeles–based designer @jamiebushco to update the home for their family. “The essence of midcentury design is about effortless indoor-outdoor living,” Bush explains. He also deployed materials that could move seamlessly from indoors to out, including wire-brushed teak and hand-molded bricks chosen both for their aesthetic qualities and for their ability to withstand the coastal climate. Oversize quartzite flagstones were meticulously pieced together to create floors that flow from the interiors through the pool courtyard and onto the driveway. Take a look at the interiors through the link in our profile. Photo by @thefacinator; text by @malleryrmorgan; styled by @michaelreynoldsnyc
20k 123
“After a two year renovation, it was apparent to me that we had to have parties, hold salons, share things—the space now seemed meant for entertaining,” says artist @kerri_scharlin of the 7,000-square-foot Greenwich Village loft she shares with her husband, Peter, and two children. The family has been in the 1910 Gold Coast building, originally used for manufacturing, for 22 years. After purchasing one loft, they eventually bought an adjacent one, creating a single vast space that now comprises both their living quarters and Scharlin's artist's studio. When the family was finally ready to really make the space whole and their own, Scharlin started researching similar projects. Her first pass at a concept for the space was a Parisian apartment. Having sat with the idea for a while, she ultimately decided that it did not feel authentic to the building or the space. Then, flipping through the pages of AD, she came across the work of @laurasantosinteriors, whose own home was featured in the magazine. Enamored with the look of what she did with the space, Scharlin arranged a meeting with Santos, who was by that time working with @sandraweingort, and she was sold, realizing immediately how much they cared about small details. The playroom, pictured, features a beautiful custom built-in bar with a backsplash made with stone from ABC Stone. The red German dining table, from @GlenDooley Antiques, is by Otto Zapf from 1967. The dining chairs are 1950s Italian and were designed by Vittorio Nobili from Versus Gallery. Take the full home tour via the link in bio. Photo by @photoisabel; text by @christianelemieux; styling by Melissa Bowers
14k 113
Marcel Breuer’s architecture is enjoying a renaissance in popularity, enhanced by the rebranding of the Whitney Museum’s former inverted-ziggurat home as the Met Breuer. But what of the modest houses that marked Breuer’s rise to fame in the 1950s as he provided a vision of suburban life outside neocolonial saltboxes? Even as the Hungarian-born, Bauhaus-trained architect has reentered the spotlight, the overheated real estate market has still spawned towering or sprawling extensions to his generally compact single-story houses, often overshadowing their signature juxtapositions of glass planes with stone walls. Ken Sena, an equity research analyst, and Joseph Mazzaferro, an executive creative director in advertising, had spent more than a decade reviving two of the multiple residences—both in Litchfield, Connecticut—that Breuer had designed for one of his most faithful clients and friends, Rufus Stillman. Building on archival evidence and hours of conversation with Stillman himself, the couple peeled away awkward additions to the 1950 Stillman I house, bringing it back as close as possible to its original state. After selling the property to faithful recruits, the couple found themselves adopting yet another Breuer house in need: the 1953 Neumann House in Croton-on-Hudson, New York. The architect considered this residence, set on a commanding hilltop with views up and down the river, one of his finest. Vera and George Neumann were both clients and collaborators. In the case of Vera’s home, the architect conceived planes of white, red, and signature blue that extend beyond the house to hover, literally, over the landscape, into which Breuer introduced an uncharacteristically sinewy low stone wall. See how the couple revived the midcentury home through the link in our profile. Photo by @francoisdischinger; text by @bbergdoll; styled by @michaelreynoldsnyc
9k 63
#AD100 design firm @ashe_leandro’s approach to actor @lievschreiber’s apartment—modernist yet utterly livable—has yielded something that all three agree is rare in the age of too-tall, too-skinny condo towers and Edison-bulbed brownstone renos. “We wanted it to feel like a real New York space,” Leandro says. And it does. What started out as a tricked out bachelor pad that Schreiber cobbled together from three units in the late ‘90s, grew up into a warm home for his family and kids. The process of working to create these reborn digs, comfortable and familiar and yet all new, brings Schreiber back to the excitement of having scored the place 20-some years ago. What he thought then is just as true now: “I never dreamed I would own a place like this.” Bardiglio marble sheathes the master bath which is outfitted with a Zuma bathtub and accented by a Jean Prouvé chair by @vitra. See the rest of the home through the link in our bio. Photo @thefacinator; text by @mrchampale; styled by @michaelreynoldsnyc
21k 94
On the hook-shaped Massachusetts isle of Nantucket, at the edge of a wind-ruffled salt marsh that fades away into the rolling Atlantic, sits a house of flowers. Not an address literally embowered by blossoms, mind you (the acreage is still a work in progress), but a smartly shingled affair with rooms that bring to mind a few high-summer herbaceous borders turned outside in. Colorful buds bloom on finely pleated lamp shades and atop a chubby little Napoléon III rope-twist stool. Flowering vines unfurl across the dining room’s crisp box-pleated slipcovers and the living room’s plump skirted sofas. Florets of undetermined origin sprout on walls, ramble up curtains, coil around cushions, effloresce on quilts, and unfold on a boldly stenciled floor. Designer @markhamroberts cultivated the blooming interiors, in which he trimmed, mixed, matched, commissioned, and, frankly, enjoyed himself. He designed dining chairs, colorful quilts, even mitered cushions in the living room, pictured here, which are crowned by striking painted panels by @bobchristiandecorativeart. See more of the home through the link in our bio. Photo by @nelson.hancock; text by @adaesthete
22k 141
Check 1,2. Actor @lievschreiber opened his door to AD for an unscripted tour of his NYC apartment. See the full video through the link in our bio.
10k 101
“We wanted the house to feel very soft and natural—a part of the landscape,” British designer Faye Toogood (@t_o_o_g_o_o_d) explains of a 5,500-square-foot home she designed on the south coast of Ibiza. To that end, she persuaded both her client (for whom she had previously done the interiors of a London townhouse) and the local planning board to let her paint the exterior of the house a warm sand tone—a marked departure from the customary bright white of Ibizan homes. Many of the rooms open onto terraces—with plantings by the London- and Ibiza-based landscape designer @stephenwoodhamsdesign, and Toogood’s furnishings—that offer sweeping views of the island and water. “This house represents a new scale of work for us,” she says. “It’s increasingly important that the synergy between the architecture and the interiors makes sense. We get a better project out of it.” See the interiors through the link in our profile. Photo by @tobiasalexanderharvey; text by @pilarviladas
26k 103