HISTORY @history
2k Posts
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Stories from the past that help you make sense of the present.
2k Posts
3.9m Followers
101 Following
Stories from the past that help you make sense of the present.
On #ThisDayinHistory 1919, the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, prohibiting the “manufacture, sale, or transportation of intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes,” is ratified. The movement for the prohibition of alcohol began in the early 19th century, when Americans concerned about the adverse effects of drinking began forming temperance societies. By the late 19th century, these groups had become a powerful political force, campaigning on the state level and calling for total national abstinence. In December 1917, the 18th Amendment, also known as the Prohibition Amendment, was passed by Congress and sent to the states for ratification. Nine months after Prohibition's ratification, Congress passed the Volstead Act, or National Prohibition Act, over President Woodrow Wilson's veto. The Volstead Act provided for the enforcement of prohibition, including the creation of a special unit of the Treasury Department. One year and a day after its ratification, prohibition went into effect—on January 17, 1920—and the nation became officially dry. Despite a vigorous effort by law-enforcement agencies, the Volstead Act failed to prevent the large-scale distribution of alcoholic beverages, and organized crime flourished in America. In 1933, the 21st Amendment to the Constitution was passed and ratified, repealing prohibition. #Prohibition #History #100years #USHistory
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On #ThisDayinHistory 100 years ago, hot molasses flooded the streets of Boston, killing 21 people and injuring scores of others. The molasses burst from a huge tank at the United States Industrial Alcohol Company building in the heart of the city. It was close to lunch time on January 15 and Boston was experiencing some unseasonably warm weather as workers were loading freight-train cars within the large building. Next to the workers was a 58-foot-high tank filled with 2.5 million gallons of crude molasses. Suddenly, the bolts holding the bottom of the tank exploded, shooting out like bullets, and the hot molasses rushed out. An eight-foot-high wave of molasses swept away the freight cars and caved in the building’s doors and windows. The huge quantity of molasses then flowed into the street outside. It literally knocked over the local firehouse and then pushed over the support beams for the elevated train line. The hot and sticky substance. In all, 21 people and dozens of horses were killed in the flood. It took weeks to clean the molasses from the streets of Boston. This disaster also produced an epic court battle, as more than 100 lawsuits were filed against the United States Industrial Alcohol Company. After a six-investigation that involved 3,000 witnesses and 45,000 pages of testimony, a special auditor finally determined that the company was at fault because the tank used had not been strong enough to hold the molasses. Nearly $1 million was paid in settlement of the claims. #MolassesFlood #Boston #USHistory #1919
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On #ThisDayinHistory 1942, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Presidential Proclamation No. 2537, requiring aliens from World War II-enemy countries–Italy, Germany and Japan–to register with the United States Department of Justice. Registered persons were then issued a Certificate of Identification for Aliens of Enemy Nationality. A follow-up to the Alien Registration Act of 1940, Proclamation No. 2537 facilitated the beginning of full-scale internment of Japanese Americans the following month. In the wake of #PearlHarbor, the West Coast appeared particularly vulnerable to another Japanese military offensive. A large population of Japanese Americans inhabited the western states and American military analysts feared some would conduct acts of sabotage on west-coast defense and agricultural industries. Though a 1941 federal report requested by Roosevelt indicated that more than 90 percent of Japanese Americans were considered loyal citizens, under increasing pressure from agricultural associations, military advisors and influential California politicians, Roosevelt agreed to begin the necessary steps for possible internment of the Japanese-American population. Ostensibly issued in the interest of national security, Proclamation No. 2537 permitted the arrest, detention and internment of enemy aliens who violated restricted areas, such as ports, water treatment plants or even areas prone to brush fires, for the duration of the war. A month later, a reluctant but resigned Roosevelt signed the War Department’s blanket Executive Order 9066, which authorized the physical removal of all Japanese Americans into internment camps. #Internment #WWII #USHistory #History
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We're 13 days in to 2019, have you kept up with your #new#newyearsresolution? Maybe you wanted to lose weight or try a new wellness habit? This woman is demonstrating a portable sweat box in 1942. The ancient Babylonians are said to have been the first people to make New Year’s resolutions, some 4,000 years ago. They were also the first to hold recorded celebrations in honor of the new year—though for them the year began not in January but in mid-March, when the crops were planted. During a massive 12-day religious festival known as Akitu, the Babylonians crowned a new king or reaffirmed their loyalty to the reigning king. They also made promises to the gods to pay their debts and return any objects they had borrowed. These promises could be considered the forerunners of our New Year’s resolutions. #history #newyears #sweat #vintage
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#ThisMonthinHistory: Elizabeth Blackwell is granted a medical degree from Geneva College, Now known as Hobart College, in New York, becoming the first woman to be officially recognized as a physician in U.S. history. Blackwell, born in Bristol, England, moved to America when she was 11 years old because her father wanted to help the growing abolitionist movement. In 1849, she graduated with the highest grades in her class and was granted an M.D. In 1857, after several years of private practice, she founded the New York Infirmary for Women and Children with her sister, Emily Blackwell, also a doctor. In 1868, the institution was expanded to include a women’s college for the training of nurses and doctors, the first of its kind in America. The next year, Blackwell returned to England, where in 1875 she became professor of gynecology at the London School of Medicine for Women, a medical discipline she had helped to establish. #ElizabethBlackwell #MedicalHistory #History #USHistory
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Today's #TBTT (Throwback Travel Thursday) takes us to France's Mont-Saint-Michel, an island off Normandy. The island boasts a Gothic-style Benedictine abbey dedicated to the archangel St Michael. Surrounding that is a village that grew up in the shadow of its great walls. It was built between the 11th and 16th centuries, the idea allegedly came to a bishop in a dream and is built to reflect the hierarchical structures of society at the time. During the Hundred Years’ War, England made repeated attempts on the island but were unable to seize it, this faliure by English forcs is said to have inspired Joan of Arc. Currently the island is visited by more than 3 million people willing to brave the tides each year. #MontSaintMichel #HunderdYearsWar #France #travel
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J. Allen Hynek studied astronomy at the University of Chicago before joining the faculty at Ohio State University. In the late 1940s, he analyzed reports of unidentified aircraft sightings as a consultant to the U.S. Air Force's "Project Sign." The following decade, he began conducting more thorough investigations under the umbrella of the renamed "Project Blue Book," with his discoveries fueling a quest to turn the study of UFOs into a legitimate scientific practice. Hynek later founded the Center for UFO Studies and published multiple books on the subject. One of them introduced the "Close Encounter" classification of sightings, inspiring the Steven Spielberg film Close Encounters of the Third Kind. HISTORY's new series Project Blue Book, based on the true, top-secret investigations Hynek conducted into UFOs and related phenomena with the United States Air Force from 1952 to 1969, premieres tonight January 8 at 10/9c. #Tonight #ProjectBlueBook #DrHynek
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#Repost @biography: #OnThisDay 1935, Elvis Presley is born in Tupelo, Mississippi. When he was 19, walked into a Memphis recording studio and paid $4 to record a few songs as a present to his mother. Sam Philips, the owner of the studio, was intrigued by the rough, soulful quality of his voice and invited Presley back to practice with some local musicians. After Philips heard Elvis sing the rhythm-and-blues song “That’s All Right,” he agreed to release the rendition as a single on his Sun Records label. The recording went to the top of the local charts, and launched Presley’s career. During the next year, Elvis attracted a growing following in the South, and in 1955 Sun Records sold his contract to RCA for a record $40,000. His first record for RCA was “Heartbreak Hotel,” which made him a national sensation in early 1956. He followed this up with the double-sided hit record “Hound Dog”/”Don’t Be Cruel.” In September 1956, Elvis appeared on The Ed Sullivan Show, a national variety television show, and teenagers went into hysterics over his dynamic stage presence, good looks, and catchy songs. This popularity with teenagers, did not dampen Elvis’s love life though, as he met his wife future Priscilla when she was a 14 year old fan. However, many parents were appalled by his sexually suggestive pelvic gyrations, and by his third appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, Elvis was filmed from only the waist up. From 1956 through 1958, Elvis dominated the music charts and is often credited with ushering in the age of rock and roll. By the end of the 1960s, however, rock and roll had undergone dramatic changes, and Elvis was no longer seen as relevant by American youth. A 1968 television special won back many of his fans, but hits were harder to come by. His final Top 10 entry, was 1972’s “Burning Love.” #Elv#Elvisley #Elvis #musichistory #elvismas
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